Trusts

A trust is a contract which allows a person or institution (a "trustee") to manage assets for the benefit of other people or institutions (the "beneficiaries"). There are many different types of trusts that serve a variety of purposes, but unfortunately there isn't typically one type of "super" trust that solves all issues a person might want to address. This does not mean all issues cannot be addressed, it just may require combining strategies.

Examples of purposes of trusts include:

  • Improved incapacity planning (avoiding courts during life)
  • Privacy
  • Ability to avoid probate (avoiding courts upon death)
  • Minimization of income and transfer tax exposure
  • Asset protection
  • Control of assets beyond one's life
  • Charitable planning
  • Providing incentives to beneficiaries
  • Qualification for or retention of public benefit eligibility
  • Taking care of a disabled child or other beneficiary who cannot/should not own assets outright

Trusts may take effect during life ("living trusts"), or at death ("testamentary trusts"). Trusts may be irrevocable (can't be changed) or revocable (can be changed during life). We can help you decide if a trust is right for you and what type of trust is the best fit based on your goals, assets, family situation, and estate size. Regardless of your situation, trusts are often used because they solve multiple problems at once, including problems that may not be solvable through the use of a will or other technique. Some commonly used trusts include:

  • Revocable trusts
  • Irrevocable trusts
  • Irrevocable life insurance trusts
  • Supplemental or special needs trusts
  • Asset protection trusts
  • Dynasty trusts
  • Charitable trusts
  • Qualified personal residence trusts
  • IRA trusts

Getting started is easy, and free. At any time you may call us at 720-370-9387, or you may use the intake form on our Contact page, and we will return your message promptly.